Funerary stela with "false door" of Iry, administrator of the Necropolis of Giza
Collections OnlineGregorian Egyptian MuseumRoom I

Funerary stela with "false door" of Iry, administrator of the Necropolis of Giza

From the Necropolis of Giza
4th dyn., approx. 2550-2525 BC
Limestone
Height 92.0 cm
cat. 22775

Funerary stelae, in the words of the ancient Egyptians served to "render living the name" of the deceased who was usually shown in the act of receiving gifts and offerings from the members of his family, seated before a table set for a feast. Subsequently then the deceased would appear in the company of some divinities. The list of the goods for the life in the hereafter of the ka (soul) of the deceased was a necessary complement to the scene. The false door, which is a development of the older custom of setting the framed stelae in the façade of a palace, was needed by the soul of the deceased to enter and leave the hereafter. In this case the real funerary stela is framed in a panel placed above the architrave of the false door. Iry, the administrator of the Necropolis of the pharaohs of Giza, is shown seated before the banquet table.