Massimo Campigli, La caccia; Donne che giocano a tennis

Photogallery

Massimo Campigli, La caccia; Donne che giocano a tennis
Massimo Campigli, La caccia; Donne che giocano a tennis
Massimo Campigli, La caccia; Donne che giocano a tennis
Massimo Campigli, La caccia; Donne che giocano a tennis
Rooms 21 and 22. Painting in Italy between the wars

Massimo Campigli painted The Hunt and Women playing tennis in Venice, where he spent the war years along with his wife, the sculptor Giuditta Scalini. In that period he intensified his relationship with the collector Carlo Cardazzo, a young industrialist and from 1940 owner of the Cavallino Gallery in Venice, who became the most important of his buyers, the editor of his etchings and the first owner of the two paintings.
The two canvases, which entered the Collection as part of the bequest of the entrepreneur Aldo Rondo, repeat themes already dear to the artist around the 1930s, and they are emblematic of Campigli’s research, influenced by Egyptian, Etruscan and Pompeian models. True also to his repertoire of form, they combine schematic female figures, distinguished by their colours and gestures, as if they were elements of a still life, with a two-dimensional affect that lends the compositions a vaguely unreal quality.