Corinthian Oinochoe by the Achradina Painter

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Corinthian Oinochoe by the Achradina Painter
Corinthian Oinochoe by the Achradina Painter
Rooms XVII and XVIII. Collection of Vases

This oinochoe is decorated with animal friezes arranged in four orders, starting from the top: 1) owl between two lions, a stilt-walker and bull facing one other, bull and owl; 2) panther and bull facing one another, bird of prey in flight between two sphinxes and two panthers, sphinx, rear-facing lion and bull facing one another; 3) lion and bull facing one another, ibex between a lion and a panther, bull and lion, panther and wild boar facing one another; 4) running hare followed by six dogs. Dotted circles forming rosettes provide background decoration.
The Achradina Painter, the master of Corinth who painted this vase in the “Transitional” style, takes his name from the quarter of Syracuse where one of the four oinochoai attributed to him was found. His repertory falls within the canons of orientalising style with the characteristic friezes of animals, with the legacy of the Proto-Corinthian style in the rosettes and the hare hunting scene, and a foretaste of Ancient Corinth in the elongated and solid form of the animals.